A new Pristolepis

Posted: June 13, 2012 in Ecology, Nature, Science, Taxonomy
Tags: , , , ,

Today Zootaxa, the mega journal of Zoological Systematics, published the details of a new Pristolepis fish from the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot. The new fish is named as Pristolepis rubripinnis, and as the name suggests has “red-orange” shade on it “fins”.  The authors have put in a lot of detail in describing this species and is a must read for naturalists, students and researchers with an interest in the ichthyo-diversity of the Western Ghats.

Pristolepis rubripinnis

In this age when science means just hunting for Impact Factors, scientists often resort to tell the “story behind their publications” elsewhere, as seen in the TreeOfLife blog. I think that scientists really enjoy the process of science and that it is a real motivation for many scientists (i.e., to follow the process after a hypothesis is formulated). However, this pleasure and the process and details is not always evident while reading majority of the scientific publications.

Whereas when you read a real TAXONOMIC work you really read the hypothesis, the process, it is a beauty. Here it started after finding a “marked colour variant of Pristolepis” and recollecting the confusion in the taxonomic literature about Pristolepis species of Western Ghats, which helped them to formlate a hypothesis seeking to answer the question “is it a species new to science”? and the answer was YES!!!!!

Earlier in 1849 Jerdon had described the first ever Pristolepis species from North Kerala “above the Palakkad Gap” as this paper says. Then Günther described Catopra malabarica in 1865. However, it was found to be a junior synonym of Pristolepis marginata by Jerdon himself the next year (see the present paper by Britz et al., for an interesting read on all these). So there was only one recognized Pristolepis from South India.

However, some authors cited both P. marginata and P. malabarica to be present in India, some others said P. marginata was the only species in India, some authors also said that P. marginata and P. fasciata were present in India. It is noteworthy that P. fasciata was described from South East Asia and its type locality is in Borneo and it has stripes on its body. No Pristolepis in India has stripes (at least until now). Another funny fact is that Indian authors have “sequenced” P. fasciata from India, when this species is absent from India, just see NCBI genbank.

So this study puts to rest a lot of confusion about Pristolepis in India. It highlights the importance of proper taxonomy before phylogeny or sequencing studies. It also takes back the readers to the real science where observation is made hypothesis is formulated and it is proved right or wrong, the writing style illustrates the process (thought process) behind the find, which should be educating for young researchers. Finally we have a new species of fish that was unknown until yesterday.

References:

1) Ralf Britz, Krishna Kumar & Fibin Baby, 2012. Pristolepis rubripinnis, a new species of fish from southern India (Teleostei: Percomorpha: Pristolepididae). Zootaxa 3345: 59–68

2) Jerdon, T.C. (1849) On the freshwater fishes of southern India. Madras Journal of Literature and Science, 15, 139–149.

3) Günther, A. (1864) Descriptions of three new species of fishes in the collection of the British Museum. The Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 3rd Series, 14, 374–376.

4) Jerdon, T.C. (1865) On Pristolepis marginatus. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 16, 298.

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Comments
  1. […] of Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot. Researchers from the same group had identified another fish Pristolepis rubripinnis, which was published in yesterdays Zootaxa. Concerted and systematic exploratory survey for fishes […]

  2. […] an open manner so that more people benefit and less human effort is lost. Also read my post on the new Pristolepis to see what happens when bad taxonomy and sequencing technology join […]

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